Angle Recession Glaucoma and Eye Trauma

This blog most frequently concentrates on subjects that directly link the eye and the brain. However, head and facial trauma can involve direct injury to the eye. Automobile accidents can cause direct trauma to the face. In particular, airbag deployment can prevent fatal brain injury but often cause eye injuries. This has been documented in… Continue Reading


Cyclosporine and Traumatic Brain Injury

Cyclosporine was first discovered in 1969 and was isolated from a fungus. The drug was immediately recognized to have tremendous immuno-suppressive properties and was put to work treating organ transplant patients facing tissue rejection. Since that time it has had numerous other clinical applications. There has been continued interest in Cyclosporine as a potential treatment… Continue Reading


Woodpeckers and Traumatic Brain Injury

So, one purpose of this blog is to get us to think and have fun. So imagine an animal that beats its head into a tree numerous times with significant force and velocity, every day. The woodpecker has a brain, and it gets slammed around quite a bit, but it adapts to this life. It… Continue Reading


Potential Blood Test Identifies Concussion

An April 20 research article out of the University of California, Irvine in collaboration with other major universities has identified a panel of 6 plasma blood test markers to help diagnose acute concussion. One purpose of this blog is to provide up-to-date scientific information on traumatic brain injury (TBI), to the general public in a… Continue Reading


Glasgow Coma scale and TBI

The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) was created in 1974 by academics Bryan Jennet and Graham Teasdale to evaluate coma and impaired consciousness in an emergency setting. The scale employs three clinical findings: eye response, motor (muscle) response and verbal response. Scores ranged from 3 (deep coma) to 15 (fully aware). The desire was to create… Continue Reading


Neuropsychologists and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

As I have discussed in previous blogs, there is often no definitive test to detect a traumatic brain injury (TBI). CT scans and MRI scans are extremely insensitive to detecting brain injuries unless those injuries are severe. Glasgow coma scales which are used to assess a patient’s awareness in the emergency room immediately after accident… Continue Reading


Pink Concussions

I attended a three day medical conference in Houston this week. The subject was Traumatic Brain Injury. The conference was attended by hundreds of professionals- I was the only ophthalmologist in attendance. Am I proud, or unhappy about this state of affairs? A little of both. So I learned something new, something that should have… Continue Reading


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